1.7 Loading and transport by off-standard truck

1.7 Loading and transport by off-standard truck

The term "off-standard trucks" refers to those who exceed the weight allowed by the Ministry of Transport to travel on public roads. These trucks only operate on unpaved forest roads that lead directly to the sawmill. When conditions permit, it is advantageous to use these trucks, since their load capacity can be up to 100 or 110 m³ of wood, about three times the load of a standard truck.
The use of a skid steer loader is desirable given the size of the truck and the load it can hold. The loading is done in the same way as on the regular trucks, that is to say with the method "big end / end end". The operator of the loader can sometimes add a small block across the load to further reduce the scrolling effect of the stems. Once his load is completed, he lays an entire trunk on the ground to allow the trucker to extend the chains that will be used to attach the load. Given the size of the truck, it is the operator of the loader who will pass the chains over the load using the entire trunk. The trucker gets his transport coupon from the loader. He then makes sure to secure his load with the help of the chains.
The heavy weight of these mastodons, once loaded, sometimes requires them to be towed by a bulldozer or other type of forest machine to climb a slope in the forest path.
During transportation, the trucker is required to make a few stops to check the condition of his load. He must then tighten the chains, since the stems are packed during transport.
He then files a copy of his transport coupon in a sealed box for the Ministry of Natural Resources and Wildlife (MRNF). The latter will thus be able to monitor the quantities of wood coming out of the forest and verify that the load goes to the processing plant specified in the contract. Similarly, the truck driver must regularly contact on-the-go vehicles to report his position. The vehicle that is a few kilometers from where it will cross the truck is then set back in a trip. A loaded truck always has priority of passage.

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